https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/senseofplaceriz/new

The pictures you are going to sea are of an anemone ! ( I thought that would rhyme and be a pun at the same time in my head) , now that I say it out loud I see it does not. Well moving on for this weeks post I have a anemone , and I found a bunch of these guys near eagle creek center , of Louisa road. This is really special to me as it was my first time seeing not just one but a whole beach filled with starfish , anemone's, and even different inter-tidal worms and not to mentions 1000's of mussels in aggregation clumped up. Truly magical it felt like I was transported into a Nat Geo documentary , it's a pity I cant upload the video's. Alright enough of me blabbering about the inter tidal species , lets get to the specifics of the Anemone I found. The anemone that you are seeing (green and red , pink tentacles) is known as the Christmas anemone because it has the colors red and green on its body, the scientific name for the species is Urticina crassicornis and is part of the class Hexacorrilia. They live in areas such as the pelagic zones , benthic and tidal. My classmate is a diver and he said that they are not that easy to spot the ones that are sessile and grounded on the ocean floor substrate but since the tides were low I was able to to see many of them , that's why I think I was just lucky. They live a very sedentary lifestyle and believe it or not as harmless as they look they are carnivorous and eat things like plankton , small fish and even different worms,mussels and other smaller molluscs . This keeps the ocean floor clean and it reminds of the the very First finding Nemo movie and that very first seen when the dad and son are playing inside the anemone , they also act as symbionts for some species.

This species is found in a variety of marine environments, including the intertidal and subtidal zones of Alaska, where it contributes to the biodiversity and health of these ecosystems.
Urticina crassicornis is known for its long lifespan, which can extend up to 80 years, and its ability to inhabit both shallow and deeper waters, from the Gulf of Alaska to Monterey, California. This anemone plays a crucial role as a predator in its ecosystem, feeding on a variety of invertebrates and fish, thereby maintaining the balance of marine life in its habitat (Animalia).
Moreover, the Christmas anemone exhibits interesting behaviors and adaptations, such as the ability to move by inflating its body and using currents to roll along the ocean floor. This is particularly useful for avoiding predators or seeking better conditions in terms of light and food availability(Animal World).

Citations in MLA (PURDUE OWL)

  1. "Urticina crassicornis - Facts, Diet, Habitat & Pictures on Animalia.bio." Animalia, www.animalia.bio/urticina-crassicornis. Accessed 12 Apr. 2024.
  2. "Painted anemone • Urticina crassicornis - Biodiversity of the Central Coast." Biodiversity of the Central Coast, www.centralcoastbiodiversity.org/painted-anemone-bull-urticina-crassicornis.html. Accessed 12 Apr. 2024.
  3. "Christmas Anemone." Animal World, animal-world.com/encyclo/marine/anemones/ChristmasAnemone.php. Accessed 12 Apr. 2024.

I HAVE PUT THE 3RD SOURCE^ INCASE ANYONE WANTS TO READ UP !!.

Posted on April 13, 2024 01:24 AM by senseofplaceriz senseofplaceriz

Comments

On iNaturalist the Christmas anemones have red bodies and the striped tentacles seem to belong to the painted anemones, but I am not a marine biologist and I think Sea Stars are cooler than anemone. The pictures you have of them surviving being out of the water for prolonged periods during the tidal shift are really interesting because I never knew they could move to other locations and had always thought they were stationary like barnacles. Thinking they would only be found in places that are always underwater, even if only as a tidepool. It would be difficult to get underwater photos for a better view to more accurately determine which anemone it is from a regular cell phone.
I wonder what considers anemone its food source as I would not imagine them to be very filling.

Posted by d_glackin about 1 month ago

Where did this data come from: "is known as the Christmas anemone because it has the colors red and green on its body, the scientific name for the species is Urticina crassicornis and is part of the class Hexacorrilia. They live in areas such as the pelagic zones , benthic and tidal. "

What about this data: "They live a very sedentary lifestyle and believe it or not as harmless as they look they are carnivorous and eat things like plankton , small fish and even different worms,mussels and other smaller molluscs . This keeps the ocean floor clean and it reminds of the the very First finding Nemo movie and that very first seen when the dad and son are playing inside the anemone , they also act as symbionts for some species.

This species is found in a variety of marine environments, including the intertidal and subtidal zones of Alaska, where it contributes to the biodiversity and health of these ecosystems.
Urticina crassicornis is known for its long lifespan, which can extend up to 80 years, and its ability to inhabit both shallow and deeper waters, from the Gulf of Alaska to Monterey, California."

Your parenthetical citations do not correctly connect to an entry in the Works Cited.

Posted by instructorschafer about 1 month ago

That was general knowledge I have from my zoology class @instructorschafer

Posted by senseofplaceriz about 1 month ago

@senseofplaceriz, thanks for your reply! However, what I've pointed out is not "general knowledge," but rather facts you learned from a professor. Your professor for your zoology class would be the source for this information. "General knowledge" refers to something that is considered reasonable that ALL people know; for example, some general knowledge tidbits might be: people breath oxygen, the planet on which we live is called Earth, etc. Latin names, on the other hand, are not something everyone would know, and the details about a species' life -- what it eats, its activity levels, etc. -- also are not considered general knowledge.

You will learn more and more specialized information as you pursue your field of education; the things you come to know will eventually be common knowledge to you, but that doesn't mean they are considered "General knowledge." Always err on the side of giving sources and people credit for the information they share with you!

Posted by instructorschafer 24 days ago

Add a Comment

Sign In or Sign Up to add comments